The Journalism Representation Index (JeRI) offers news outlets and media watchdogs a rare view of how journalists fare in representing all of the key stakeholders in stories of heightened public interest.

 
The JERI pilot project examines sourcing and representation in Toronto media coverage of police carding and racial profiling.

The JERI pilot project examines sourcing and representation in Toronto media coverage of police carding and racial profiling.

 

The Project

Newsrooms make hundreds of invisible judgements everyday. To whom do journalists speak? Who do they quote? From whose point of view are stories told and whose voices get the most prominence? Research shows news under-represents citizens and activists and favours authority and power.
 

 

Using named-entity recognition, JeRI categorizes and weights the types of sources quoted and represented in a news story.

 
 

The Journalism Representation Index (JeRI) offers news organizations and media watchdogs a rare view of how journalists fare in representing all of the key stakeholders in stories of heightened public interest. 

Using named-entity recognition, JeRI categorizes and weights the types of sources quoted and represented in a news story and helps newsrooms understand the cumulative impact of the choices they make in sourcing their journalism.  

JeRI offers a performance index about the variety and depth of sources reporters are representing. This evaluation offers valuable insights into stories of particular importance. For our pilot project, we are focusing on stories about police carding and racial profiling in Toronto media coverage.

 
 

How JeRI works

  • Identifies journalism sources ("named entities"), i.e. citizens, politicians, activists, experts, celebrities
  • Categorizes sources it has detected into structure grounded in communications framing theory
  • Weights sources in relation to prominence in text
  • Produces an aggregate index based on categories and prominence